TAS Engineering: Dynamic Thermal modelling suite - Companion Additional Licence

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Industry-Leading Building Modelling and Simulation

 

Please note this is a Companion Additional Licence and will require the TAS Primiary Licence.

Tas software is developed by Environmental Design Solutions Limited (EDSL) which was formed in 1989. Tas is an industry-leading building modelling and simulation tool.

Capable of performing hourly dynamic thermal simulation for the world's largest and most complex buildings.

Tas allows designers to accurately predict energy consumption, CO2 emissions, operating costs and occupant comfort . Utilising “Studio” approach the underlying building simulation can be plugged in to the  legislative calculation “studio” tool   to meet Part L , LEED,  ASHRAE and numerous other global standards.

The benefits of TAS, centre around its speed and ease of use with full multicore enabled calculation methods.

Fully dynamic plant modelling simulations can be performed using actual manufacturers plant with in built performance data, to see how the plant responds to the building simulation giving very accurate results. These are then used to analyse where the power and energy is being used so decisions can be made.

Tas is one of 4 C.I.E. approved calculation tools ( the others being daylight specialists)  to undertake Climate Based Daylight Modelling (CBDM) which gives accurate results where daylighting calculation accuracy has a bearing on the artificial lighting design, its control, power consumption and energy efficiency.

The industry issue, you will experience, of reconstructing 3D geometry in thermal simulation packages has been resolved by the implementation of 2 key technologies  unique to TAS.

The first of the key technologies is to fill and remove any gaps that occur when gbXML is written and the underlying geometry of the building model is simplified. Even if the 3D building is modelled perfectly in Architectural building modellers, when the gbXML geometry is written there will still be anomalies, that would otherwise need to be analysed and fixed by hand in other thermal modelling tools. TAS fixes these automatically, gives an audit trail of the fixes applied and visually on the model if required. This means there is no longer a need to remodel the building leveraging time and money, as opposed to haemorrhaging time and money remodelling the building where constant changes are usually having to be applied.

The second of the key technologies is unique to Tas with its ability to seamlessly merge changes as the source architectural model evolves. If you as the engineer has spent time changing the model , would you want evolved model changes effectively undoing and overwriting your previous efforts , wasting time and money?...you wouldn’t.

Tas allows the user to start their design and model the building and seamlessly merge the changes with the work already previously undertaken. Even if a simulation has been performed, any updates to the 3D model can be merged and the revised simulation undertaken quickly and effectively.

Combing these 2 key technologies with multi core enabling to allow quick simulation you have a very practical powerful tool to allow more investigative and iterative workflow to “squeeze” the building saving the client time and money

Ask yourself this, Why would you want to spend time re modelling a building (against the BIM level 2 ethos), fixing gaps, having this all undone with the next iteration of the architects model without being able to merge any changes?

Climate based daylight modelling originated in the lighting simulation community. Hourly diffuse and direct solar radiation climate data is used to produce daylight coefficients for patches of sky. Irradiance data is converted to illuminance using a luminous efficacy model. The daylight contribution to the space is then calculated hourly through the year for each sky patch.

EDSL’s Tas software has originated in the thermal simulation community. Our Tas software calculates the diffuse and direct solar distribution in spaces hourly through the year. We have developed a daylighting simulation engine, which is fully integrated with our thermal simulation engine. We are, therefore, able to calibrate the daylight contribution from the solar contribution in a space using luminous efficacy. Put simply, we convert the hourly solar income into hourly daylight income.

The following powerpoint illustrates the functionality of the combined thermal and daylight simulation model on a classroom.

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Minimum: Entry-Level Configuration 
Operating System Microsoft Windows 7 SP1 64-bit: 
Windows 7 Enterprise, Ultimate, Professional, or Home Premium 
Microsoft Windows 8 64-bit: 
Windows 8 Enterprise, Pro, or Windows 8 
Microsoft Windows 8.1 64-bit: 
Windows 8.1 Enterprise, Pro, or Windows 8.1 

CPU Type Single- or Multi-Core Intel Pentium, Xeon, or i-Series processor or AMD equivalent with SSE2 technology. Highest affordable CPU speed rating recommended. 

TAS software products will use multiple cores for many tasks, using up to 16 cores for near-photorealistic rendering operations. 

Memory 4 GB RAM 
Usually sufficient for a typical editing session for a single model up to approximately 100 MB on disk. This estimate is based on internal testing and customer reports. Individual models will vary in their use of computer resources and performance characteristics. 

Models created in previous versions of Revit software products may require more available memory for the one-time upgrade process. 

Video Display 1,280 x 1,024 with true color 
DPI Display Setting: 150% or less 
Video Adapter Basic Graphics: 
Display adapter capable of 24-bit color 

Advanced Graphics: 
DirectX 11 capable graphics card with Shader Model 3 as recommended by Autodesk. 

Disk Space 5 GB free disk space 

Media Download or installation from DVD9 or USB key 

Pointing Device MS-Mouse or 3Dconnexion compliant device 

Browser Microsoft Internet Explorer 7.0 (or later) 
Connectivity Internet connection for license registration and prerequisite component download 

Performance: Large, complex models 

Operating System Microsoft Windows 7 SP1 64-bit: 
Windows 7 Enterprise, Ultimate, Professional, or Home Premium 
Microsoft Windows 8 64-bit: 
Windows 8 Enterprise, Pro, or Windows 8 
Microsoft Windows 8.1 64-bit: 
Windows 8.1 Enterprise, Pro, or Windows 8.1 

CPU Type Multi-Core Intel Xeon, or i-Series processor or AMD equivalent with SSE2 technology. Highest affordable CPU speed rating recommended. 
TAS software products will use multiple cores for many tasks, using up to 16 cores for near-photorealistic rendering operations. 

Memory 16 GB RAM 
Usually sufficient for a typical editing session for a single model up to approximately 700 MB on disk. This estimate is based on internal testing and customer reports. Individual models will vary in their use of computer resources and performance characteristics. 
Models created in previous versions of Revit software products may require more available memory for the one-time upgrade process. 

Video Display 1,920 x 1,200 with true color 
DPI Display Setting: 150% or less 
Video Adapter DirectX 11 capable graphics card with Shader Model 3 as recommended by Autodesk. 

Disk Space 5 GB free disk space 
10,000+ RPM (for Point Cloud interactions) or Solid State Drive 

Media Download or installation from DVD9 or USB key 

Pointing Device MS-Mouse or 3Dconnexion compliant device 

Browser Microsoft Internet Explorer 7.0 (or later) 
Connectivity Internet connection for license registration and prerequisite component download

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The complete Dynamic Building Simulation package. 

Tas Engineering has a modular design and is split into three main programs, the 3D Modeller, Building Simulator and Results Viewer. The intuitive Windows interface has features such as undo/redo, drag drop, context menus etc. all making the software more productive and easier to use. The program architecture clearly defines the simulation workflow process facilitating methodical working by the Engineer. 

3D Modeller 

The 3D Modeller is developed specifically for creating building models for simulation. You can use it to draw buildings that are still only at the rough outline sketch stage, or import CAD drawings to generate more detailed models. From this model you can create rendered 3D views that display comprehensive shading. Tas will even calculate sunshine penetration through the interior of the building between spaces. The model can be exported to 3rd party programs via a 3D dwg export facility. 

Building Simulator 

Each window, door, ventilator or other aperture has its relative altitude and orientation automatically calculated to give a potential airflow network through the building. This means that natural ventilation is simulated automatically, and you choose which apertures are open, when, and by how much. Dynamic control of apertures can be implemented using control functions. 

Results Viewer 

Any combination of parameters from any number of Zones and Surfaces can be displayed and compared in a tabular and graphical format. 

The unified database system used throughout the package enables external data access by any Automation client (e.g. Word, Excel etc.). Third party applications are able to integrate easily by using the automation interfaces to input and extract data. Even very large simulation data files running into hundreds of megabytes can be manipulated with great speed by this technology. 


Comprehensive Databases 

Construction materials and glazing types can be allocated from the comprehensive databases. These have their dynamic response automatically calculated in the model. The occupation of the building is represented by a calendar, with different day types having varying schedules of use. The final ingredient that brings the building model to life is the climate data used to drive the simulation. Tas Building Designer gives you access to over 2,500 recorded weather sites worldwide. The data consists of hourly values for solar, temperature, humidity and wind speed and direction.

Heating & Cooling Loads with annual Energy Demand

Sizing heating and cooling loads is an important function of Tas Engineering. You can use it to compare the relative merits of different heating and cooling strategies. Tas can evaluate newer systems such as displacement ventilation or floor supply of fresh air with chilled beams or ceilings, as well as calculating loads for standard systems such as fan-coil or vav.

Heating & Cooling pdf

Natural Ventilation and Passive Design

When you design the building envelope and structure to control, or partly control the internal environment, the quality of analysis needs to be more accurate and cover a wider range of issues than simplified cooling load calcs.

Natural Ventilation and Passive Design pdf

Natural Ventilation and Mixed Mode

This powerful combination, called Tas-Flows, provides a comprehensive design tool for the development of successful passive design strategies. The effective use of thermal mass, solar protection and natural, or mixed mode, ventilation regimes can all be studied in a fully integrated simulation.

Opening of windows etc, and the use of solar controls, may be scheduled against a range of performance parameters for the occupied spaces and external climate.

During the development cycle Tas-Flows has been used to evaluate the passive design strategies for a number of projects. Notable amongst these is the new Powergen HQ, for which monitored data is available on the behaviour of the occupied building.

Over the exceptionally hot summer of 1995 the building performed well, exhibiting many of the behavioural characteristics predicted by the Tas-Flows simulations undertaken by the design team.

Natural Ventilation and Mixed Mode pdf

Evaluating Ventilation Regimes

Tas - A Comprehensive and Flexible Modelling Tool for Evaluating a Wide Range of Design Scenarios

Evaluating Ventilation Regimes pdf

Empirical Validation

INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AGENCY (IEA)

Energy Conservation in Buildings & Community Systems Annex 21 Subtask C

Empirical Validation of Thermal Building Simulation Programs Using Test Room Data

An important part of the programme of work undertaken by the IEA research team was the identification of good quality monitored data on building thermal performance. Careful scrutiny of data sets from around the world culminated in the choice of measured data produced by the Energy Monitoring Company (EMC) at their Cranfield University test site.

The EMC data is of high quality, meeting the many stringent criteria specified by the IEA team. The test rooms were carefully constructed and the monitoring equipment and procedures were of a high standard. Of fundamental importance was the fact that detailed hourly weather data was also collected at the site.

Empirical Validation pdf

The Simulation and The Reality

The new, naturally ventilated office at the Building Research Establishment, Garston, England, illustrates the ability of Tas to accurately predict the key features of building performance, such as natural ventilation, thermal mass and solar shading.

The Simulation and The Reality pdf

CIBSE Guide A Environmental Design Calculations

How do the procedures compare?

The main difference between the CIBSE steady state heat loss / admittance procedures and dynamic simulation is the ability dynamic simulation to take account of variations in weather over a number of days.

Steady state heat loss is the equivalent of running a 24 hour heated building with no internal heat gains for a long period of weather at a constant outside air temperature and no solar income. Remove the internal heat gains from a Tas dynamic simulation model. Run the model using a weather file with constant outside air temperature and no sunshine. At the end of a 30 day period the simulated heating load is exactly the same as the steady state heat loss calculation.

The admittance procedure uses a 24 hour harmonic to predict summer design day performance using idealised weather data for the design day. The procedure does not have the ability to carry forward the influence on performance of previous days. In fact, the procedure assumes that the design day has been preceded by an infinite number of identical days. To reproduce this type of analysis with Tas dynamic simulation software an extended period of weather data is used. This weather data contains repeated days of the same idealised weather used in the admittance procedure. At the end of a 30 day simulation on repeated day weather the simulated performance is very close to that predicted by the admittance method.

It is therefore possible using idealised weather to perform the equivalent of standard heat loss / admittance calculations.

The following examples from Guide A Section 5 show how closely simulation reproduces standard CIBSE calculations.

CIBSE Guide A pdf

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£4,000.00

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